My name is Tamara Thompson, I'm 23 and lead a no B.S. life. Beautiful things make me smile and i love creative invention. This blog is a reflection of who I am in who and what i love.
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Reblogged from twiilah  144,959 notes
Chinese doctors bowing down to a 11 year old boy diagnosed with brain cancer who managed to save several lives by donating his organs to the hospital he was being treated in shortly before his death
This is absolutely amazing and so beautiful in so many ways. This is the respect that all organ donors should receive. I have so many emotions and feelings towards the idea of donating ones organs. This photo stirs up so much inside me and brings me back to my brothers death which I haven’t really talked about too much, other than how I’m doing in regards to it and to inform those who’ve asked when the event initially occurred. I have very strong feelings about the act and process of donating one’s organs and this photo has urged me to express these. For those of  you who don’t know my brother passed away last October just before Halloween. A few years before, he had suffered several brain aneurysms which went largely untreated by the hospital he originally went to in Barrie which is a town north of Toronto. He was sent home multiple times from the emergency room being told his headaches were simply just headaches, until one ruptured and he was forced to be taken to Toronto General hospital where he underwent major brain surgery (and 2 more more vessels broke on the table) and they had to put a stint in his head. I remember him staying at our house over christmas all purple and swollen. I was about 14 at the time and was absolutely horrified. 
As the years went on he continued to get bad dizzy spells and headaches as a symptom. I remember him so many times stating how he wished the doctors “just let him die” rather than operating. In the last year or so of his life his headaches began to increase and would wake up every morning vomiting from the pain. He went back to Barrie hospital about a week before his final episode and they told him that he was just dehydrated and gave him painkillers and told him to drink a lot of water over the next few days. they sent a man they knew had a history of these serious issues home without any tests or head scans. I don’t know if this is a result of Ontario’s hospitals being understaffed and overcrowded, doctors and nurses being jaded and overworked, or just pure laziness and negligence. He went to work one day later that week and because he felt so sick he decided to go home early. He got a ride home with a friend who stopped at the beer store. He grabbed a 6 pack for the weekends, got his bike out the back of the truck and began to ride the two blocks back home from there. On his way back the new aneurysm burst and he fell off his bike. Apparently one of his neighbours found him on the side of the road foaming from the mouth and talking in gibberish and called 911. He was flown to Toronto general by helicopter and they operated. My parents got the phone call 2 days later when they were able to identify him and find family numbers to call. He had survived the surgery but was in a coma and had less than 1% brain activity. We were told it was unlikely that he would ever come out of it and if he did that he would basically be a vegetable. My brother always said he never wanted to be like that and with his complaints and wishing he had died the first time he had this happen to him contributed to my parents decision to take him off life support.The decision was made to donate his organs to those who needed transplants. All the forms were filled out and tests were done to see what could be donated and patients and families of those on wait lists were informed and prepped for surgery when he was taken off life support. This is where i begin to get upset. His machines were turned off in the morning and he didn’t pass until later that afternoon. It makes one wonder if in any bit of consciousness or awareness he had, that he knew he was about to die. They give patients morphine when they do this to minimize any pain or panic, which is a good thing. But still, its far too dragged out. Another problem is because it took him so long to pass, none of his organs could be used or donated. It seemed like such a waste. The person taken off support has to pass within the first hour, otherwise the body begins to decay and the organs can’t be transplanted. I kept thinking about all the people and families who had gotten their hopes up for a new chance at life. It must have been heartbreaking. The fact that my family had thought that at least in my brothers death, others would be helped and hopefully get their lives back made taking him off support easier and offered comfort and some peace of mind. That was taken away. No one benefited this. I still wonder if those people ended up getting their much needed transplants and surgeries, if they’re still waiting, or if they passed as well. I genuinely feel that there is a need for compassionate assisted suicide in cases like this. Had it been legal, my brother would have been able to pass much quicker and more peacefully. My family would not have had to endure the pain and heartache of having his death dragged out and the false hope that maybe he would be able to survive without the machines. Most importantly there would have been an end put to several people’s waiting and praying to have their lives back. 

Chinese doctors bowing down to a 11 year old boy diagnosed with brain cancer who managed to save several lives by donating his organs to the hospital he was being treated in shortly before his death

This is absolutely amazing and so beautiful in so many ways. This is the respect that all organ donors should receive. I have so many emotions and feelings towards the idea of donating ones organs. This photo stirs up so much inside me and brings me back to my brothers death which I haven’t really talked about too much, other than how I’m doing in regards to it and to inform those who’ve asked when the event initially occurred. I have very strong feelings about the act and process of donating one’s organs and this photo has urged me to express these. 

For those of  you who don’t know my brother passed away last October just before Halloween. A few years before, he had suffered several brain aneurysms which went largely untreated by the hospital he originally went to in Barrie which is a town north of Toronto. He was sent home multiple times from the emergency room being told his headaches were simply just headaches, until one ruptured and he was forced to be taken to Toronto General hospital where he underwent major brain surgery (and 2 more more vessels broke on the table) and they had to put a stint in his head. I remember him staying at our house over christmas all purple and swollen. I was about 14 at the time and was absolutely horrified. 

As the years went on he continued to get bad dizzy spells and headaches as a symptom. I remember him so many times stating how he wished the doctors “just let him die” rather than operating. In the last year or so of his life his headaches began to increase and would wake up every morning vomiting from the pain. He went back to Barrie hospital about a week before his final episode and they told him that he was just dehydrated and gave him painkillers and told him to drink a lot of water over the next few days. they sent a man they knew had a history of these serious issues home without any tests or head scans. I don’t know if this is a result of Ontario’s hospitals being understaffed and overcrowded, doctors and nurses being jaded and overworked, or just pure laziness and negligence. 

He went to work one day later that week and because he felt so sick he decided to go home early. He got a ride home with a friend who stopped at the beer store. He grabbed a 6 pack for the weekends, got his bike out the back of the truck and began to ride the two blocks back home from there. On his way back the new aneurysm burst and he fell off his bike. Apparently one of his neighbours found him on the side of the road foaming from the mouth and talking in gibberish and called 911. He was flown to Toronto general by helicopter and they operated. My parents got the phone call 2 days later when they were able to identify him and find family numbers to call. He had survived the surgery but was in a coma and had less than 1% brain activity. We were told it was unlikely that he would ever come out of it and if he did that he would basically be a vegetable. My brother always said he never wanted to be like that and with his complaints and wishing he had died the first time he had this happen to him contributed to my parents decision to take him off life support.

The decision was made to donate his organs to those who needed transplants. All the forms were filled out and tests were done to see what could be donated and patients and families of those on wait lists were informed and prepped for surgery when he was taken off life support. This is where i begin to get upset. His machines were turned off in the morning and he didn’t pass until later that afternoon. It makes one wonder if in any bit of consciousness or awareness he had, that he knew he was about to die. They give patients morphine when they do this to minimize any pain or panic, which is a good thing. But still, its far too dragged out. Another problem is because it took him so long to pass, none of his organs could be used or donated. It seemed like such a waste. The person taken off support has to pass within the first hour, otherwise the body begins to decay and the organs can’t be transplanted. I kept thinking about all the people and families who had gotten their hopes up for a new chance at life. It must have been heartbreaking. The fact that my family had thought that at least in my brothers death, others would be helped and hopefully get their lives back made taking him off support easier and offered comfort and some peace of mind. That was taken away. No one benefited this. I still wonder if those people ended up getting their much needed transplants and surgeries, if they’re still waiting, or if they passed as well. 

I genuinely feel that there is a need for compassionate assisted suicide in cases like this. Had it been legal, my brother would have been able to pass much quicker and more peacefully. My family would not have had to endure the pain and heartache of having his death dragged out and the false hope that maybe he would be able to survive without the machines. Most importantly there would have been an end put to several people’s waiting and praying to have their lives back. 

Reblogged from jezebeler  127,677 notes

My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.

By Libby Anne (via jezebeler)

Reblogged from condom  33,879 notes

luaren:

honestly can’t wait for the 50 shades movie to normalize the manipulation of lower-level female employees.  can’t wait for the new wave of “consent is sexy” banners on the cover of cosmo.  can’t wait for teen girls to think that a controlling relationship is romantic.  can’t wait for sexualized violence to become increasingly mainstream.  and most of all, i can’t wait for bdsm to be labeled a feminist revolution

Should not have been allowed to be made into a film. Just sayin’.

Reblogged from jezebeler  60,801 notes

My mistrust [of men] is not, as one might expect, primarily a result of the violent acts done on my body, nor the vicious humiliations done to my dignity. It is, instead, born of the multitude of mundane betrayals that mark my every relationship with a man—the casual rape joke, the use of a female slur, the careless demonization of the feminine in everyday conversation, the accusations of overreaction, the eye rolling and exasperated sighs in response to polite requests to please not use misogynist epithets in my presence. By (via jezebeler)